Blog Archives

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[Part 1] …[an] insidious gang of possible accomplices… we’ll need to investigate a little further before passing judgment. . The Winter of Life . At the worst of the Ice Age, the Arctic of now was the Europe of then- ice to the North, then permafrost all the way south to the Alps, then tundra and […]

My latest addition in the Osprey Men-at-Arms series is Latin American Wars 1900-1941. Subtitled “’Banana Wars,’ Border Wars & Revolutions,” it covers mostly small wars of Latin America. The booklet does not cover the Mexican revolution and civil wars of the teens and the Chaco War between Bolivia and Peru in the 1930s. That was […]

[Part 1] Flowers were invented towards the end of the dinosaur’s reign, then grass, that uncanny, flowering plant.   The Autumn of Life   Around the time the dinosaurs left us, or maybe sometime after, the Earth began to get colder. There was a brief Indian Summer of an Eocene High, followed by the Azolla […]

This video is an excellent summary of the fighting in Europe at the end of WW2.  I love the graphics which show the movements of corps and armies and the map’s color even changes in winter. I knew a lot of bad strategic defensive decisions were made by the Germans (all Hitler’s fault?) towards the end […]

Yesterday was the 204th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo making this week’s WW post a perfect time to recommend two excellent books and an interview I conducted with author (Waterloo Betrayed) Stephen Beckett.  Always a risky thing recommending books on Waterloo as there have been a multitude of books published on the topic but […]

Printed before the war ended, Thrilling Stories of the Russian-Japanese War covers the 1904 – 1905 war up to the Battle of Mukden but before the final naval catastrophe at Tsushima.  The title is a little misleading as the first eight chapters provides a comprehensive overview of Japanese history, the Mikado (imperial dynasty), home life […]

Paracelsus The first written mention of gnomes has been attributed to Theophrastus von Hohenheim, known as Paracelsus, a 16th century physician and alchemist, in his posthumously published (1566) book,  Ex Libro de Nymphis, Sylvanis, Pygmaeis, Salamandris et Gigantibus, etc..  Many web articles on gnomes mention the book and include brief excerpts on the nature of the […]

There is a short chapter in R. Dupuy’s St. Vith Lion in the Way on artillery spotting planes titled Bumble Bees in the Fog. Unfortunately, the L2 and L4  light aircraft used for spotting are only mentioned briefly and just a third of the chapter talks about this interesting topic  I’m guessing much of the original […]

World War 2 started on September 1, 1939 with the infantrymen of the initial belligerents using the same rifles used a generation before in World War 1. The biggest difference was the use of a new generation of light machine guns – Bren guns, MG-34s etc. The submachine gun did have an impact, and everyone […]

A few months back I posted about Project 1944, a group of Belgian historical researchers and reenactors who focus on the great wars of the 20th Century.  My Bulge series of posts has highlighted the Volks-grenadiers and I was glad to see the recent “Kochen im Feld” or “Cooking in the Field” post which presents […]

American and German Medical Care in WW2:  Two posts in the Battle of the Bulge series.  The post on American medical care has some Bulge related content and links but is mostly a general overview of American medicine in the European Theater of Operations.  I couldn’t find much information online concerning German medicine during the […]

M*A*S*H – This television series was a constant on early evening television in the 70’s up through the early 80’s.  This History.com article on Richard Hornberger discusses his role as a surgeon at a MASH unit during the Korean War and the book he wrote under the alias of Richard Hooker.  It seems that Hornberger didn’t […]