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A reader of both the history of firearms, history, and science fiction generally leads to a collision of all three. I have discussed how many governments chose not to make changes in small arms. Light machine guns were seized upon with enthusiasm but not self-loading rifles. You start to think of “what ifs?” The Third […]

World War 2 had shown that small infantry units could do more with increased firepower. The German Sturmgewehr 44 pointed the direction to the future with select fire capability and a less powerful cartridge. The bolt action rifle still had some life in it. The first Arab-Israeli War fought in 1948 mainly with bolt action […]

There is a short chapter in R. Dupuy’s St. Vith Lion in the Way on artillery spotting planes titled Bumble Bees in the Fog. Unfortunately, the L2 and L4  light aircraft used for spotting are only mentioned briefly and just a third of the chapter talks about this interesting topic  I’m guessing much of the original […]

World War 2 started on September 1, 1939 with the infantrymen of the initial belligerents using the same rifles used a generation before in World War 1. The biggest difference was the use of a new generation of light machine guns – Bren guns, MG-34s etc. The submachine gun did have an impact, and everyone […]

The interwar period of 1919 to 1939 in the realm of small arms has two distinct periods. The first half 1919-1929 was a time awash in WW 1 surplus. The Polish-Soviet War, the Freikorps action in the Baltic States were all fought with WW 1 weaponry. The British and French Empires were enlarged by territory […]

Last week, I mentioned a mistake in the novel Skylark Mission with the mention of Japanese automatic rifles in World War II. I thought I would discuss small arms of World War II with some emphasis on “automatic rifles.” I started writing and ended up with multi-part series. Modern firearms have their origin in the […]

A few months back I posted about Project 1944, a group of Belgian historical researchers and reenactors who focus on the great wars of the 20th Century.  My Bulge series of posts has highlighted the Volks-grenadiers and I was glad to see the recent “Kochen im Feld” or “Cooking in the Field” post which presents […]

American and German Medical Care in WW2:  Two posts in the Battle of the Bulge series.  The post on American medical care has some Bulge related content and links but is mostly a general overview of American medicine in the European Theater of Operations.  I couldn’t find much information online concerning German medicine during the […]

I was lucky enough to interview game designer Brian Train and highly recommend you check it out. For those that are unfamiliar with Brian I’ll offer two insights into his thought on game design: In the interview I ask him how he would go about designing a simulation on the current events in Venezuela. Brian’s […]

The title from today’s post taken from Hugh Cole’s The Ardennes: Battle of the Bulge.  In the previous post, the Germans have taken the village of Bleialf and have driven the 14th Armored Group back to Andler.  In this post, the two pincers of the German advance snap shut at Schoenburg, cutting off the 106th Infantry […]

Shelters for the Self is a book by James La Fond and your’s truly. I was fortunate to be asked by James (a Wargame Wednesday fan) to take a look at a transcription of an Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) sailor’s diary drafted during the 1944 battle on Biak Island.  The original diary was lost and the typewritten transcription was […]

Named after the date of the German invasion of Denmark and released in 2015 I have only just seen April 9th but it is one of my all time, favorite war movies.   Over at IMBD, there are many favorable reviews, most of them commenting on historical accuracy. The negative aspects in the one neutral review […]