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Mike Resnick is a writer with a career spanning five decades. I read The Goddess of Ganymede thirty years ago when I found it in a used book store.  I have read a few other things by him over the years – Santiago, Ivory, The Soul Eater. I enjoyed the two Ganymede sword and planet […]

The print and broadcast media went through their adolescence during a time when the bi-polar world of Cold War dominated the Great Game between world powers.  As a result, the espionage genre, which prior to WWII delved into the rich complexities of the Great Game, came to be dominated by the Battle of the Iron Curtain.  […]

Last week, I looked at Marvin Albert as “Ian MacAlister’s” Strike Force 7. Three weeks ago, I had some good luck at the library book sale. I picked up nine James Bond novels by Ian Fleming, Signet/New American Library editions from the 60s and early 70s. Found a nice Modesty Blaise paperback with Robert McGinnis […]

Up to this point, this light novel survey has been focused on stories set in the writers’ present. The recent history of the medium can be organized into three great periods: the secondary fantasy worlds of  the 1980s and 1990s, the primary fantasy adventures of the 1990s and 2000s, and the isekai portal fantasies of the 2000s and […]

A couple of books I picked up for a long flight:   The Seventh Circle – “A former Australian soldier’s extraordinary story of surviving seven years in Afghanistan’s most notorious prison”.  No surprise that the Afghan justice system is corrupt and that money talks but the book provides great insights into life behind bars in […]

Two months ago, I wrote a piece about Marvin Albert writing as “Ian MacAlister’s” Skylark Mission. Strike Force 7 was the third novel under this pseudonym. Another Fawcett Gold Medal paperback from June 1974. Originally sold for $.95 cents. The cover has a distinct pulp atmosphere to it. Strike Force 7 has a contemporary setting […]

Previous entries in this light novel recommendation series have explored Tolkien’s primary and secondary worlds, with the aim of explaining the mechanics of isekai portal fantasies that take characters from the present and fling them into fantasy worlds. As a result, the selections have dealt with heroes from the primary world–our world. But self-contained and internally consistent fantasy worlds […]

This is a guest post by Rich. Take it away:   It has now been more than forty years since small press stalwart David Madison shot himself dead in an Arlington railway yard. He was twenty six years old. I do not presume to understand why he did this. And I am not about to […]

Friend of the blog, Karl K. Gallagher, best known for his Torchship trilogy of hard sci-fi novels (previously reviewed here), took a swing at the fantasy genre fastball this spring with the release of his Lost War duopoly.  The result is a solid, stand-up triple with much to recommend it.  It’s a wild blend of […]

Yesterday was the 204th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo making this week’s WW post a perfect time to recommend two excellent books and an interview I conducted with author (Waterloo Betrayed) Stephen Beckett.  Always a risky thing recommending books on Waterloo as there have been a multitude of books published on the topic but […]

Brand new from DMR Books is Byron A. Roberts’ The Chronicles of Caylen-Tor. I have mentioned Roberts’ fiction in the past in Swords of Steel and Swords of Steel III. The Chronicles of Caylen-Tor is a collection of three novellas along with some appendices. The setting is antediluvian, just before the “Second Cataclysm.” “The Siege […]

In the far-distant future, mankind has traversed the stars and settled distant worlds. But no matter how advanced the technology of the future becomes, it seems the spacefaring nations cannot entirely shed their human nature. Jinto Lin finds this out the hard way when, as a child, his home world is conquered by the powerful […]